Current Status

Wolf Biology and Habitat

Expanding Their Range

As most of you know, a federal judge has relisted the wolf as an endangered species for the fourth time in ten years.   On August 1, 2017, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington D.C. upheld the lower court’s ruling to keep the wolves on the endangered list, even though they are well beyond their targeted recovery numbers.  


You have heard lately that The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will soon be de-listing the wolf. While this is great news, it will most likely be short-lived.  
To achieve a permanent solution, SASC is working with Congressman Jack Bergman, Safari Club International, The Upper Peninsula Sportsmen’s Alliance, and the Michigan United Conservation Club to pass into law through the United States Congress a bill that will remove the gray wolf as an endangered species PERMANENTLY!


Check back we will keep you updated as we learn more.

Expanding Their Range

Wolf Biology and Habitat

Expanding Their Range

Wolves began naturally returning to Michigan's Upper Peninsula via Canada and Wisconsin in the early 1990s. Since that time populations have increased and continue to expand their range. Evidence of range expansion into the Lower Peninsula came when a gray wolf was accidentally killed in Presque Isle County in 2004.   
In 2015 the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced the second confirmed presence of a gray wolf in the Lower Peninsula since 1910.   This wolf probably crossed on the ice between the U.P. and the Lower Peninsula.

Wolf Biology and Habitat

Wolf Biology and Habitat

Wolf Biology and Habitat

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Wolves are the largest member of the Canid family (wild dogs), which also includes coyotes and red and gray foxes.
As adults, wolves average 30 inches in height at the shoulder and 65 pounds. Their feet are generally 3 1/2 inches wide and 4 1/2 inches long, and provide an easy way of differentiating wolves from coyotes, whose feet are only 1 1/2 inches wide and 2 1/2 inches long.


To learn more about Wolves in Michigan click on the link below.

MI Wolf Management Plan

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

Wolf Biology and Habitat

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Michigan revised its Wolf Management Plan.  Click on the link below to review it.

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

Michigan DNR wildlife biologists completed their 2018 Winter Survey and estimate there is a minimum of 662 wolves found among 139 packs across the Upper Peninsula this past winter. The 2016 minimum population estimate was 618 wolves.
Fifteen more wolf packs were found during this past winter’s survey than in 2016, but pack size has decreased slightly and now averages less than five wolves.

Wolf Sighting In Michigan

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

Wolf Population Slowly Growing

 The gray wolf is currently listed as a federally endangered species.  Wolves have been found in every county of the Upper Peninsula, but some years they have been absent from Keweenaw County (excluding Isle Royale) during the population surveys. Please report wolf sightings using the link below. 

Wolf Sighting in St Ignace, MI

A Club member passed this along to us this past spring.  Both videos were taken along the boulevard in St. Ignace Michigan.